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Becoming a Marine Conservation Officer…

Pictured above: To guard against disease for both the consumer and oyster beds, farmers must comply with both ambient temperature and harvest limits for their operation in Little Egg Harbor. Officer Nicklow conducts random testing to insure compliance.

Growing up in the city, I learned how to fish and hunt along the Delaware River up the street from our row home. Nothing too exotic – catfish, carp and eels were the most common catches of the day. Back then, the Delaware wasn’t as “fish friendly” as it has become today. We learned to fish through trial and error since our fathers were often too busy working long hours at their blue-collar jobs. No complaints, mind you. That’s just the way it was. Things were different back then.


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